Essential Cinema: Cinema 40

Films from the Cinema 40 Archive

Directed by Various

Various, 1h 40min, DCP

Essential Cinema  Cinema 40

There are no current or future screenings planned for this film.

Jim Morrison (THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER) and Andy Warhol (PORTRAIT OF TED O’NEILL) donated these original short films to Cinema 40 for their archive. Restorations of the films will screen alongside original works by Gregg Barrios made during that period, featuring on campus Vietnam protests and UT visits from Jonas Mekas and Allen Ginsburg. Introduction by Gregg Barrios. 

 

Films in this program: 

Gregg Barrios’ FLOWER POWER TRILOGY and BOYS OF NEW YORK, Jim Morrison’s THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER, Andy Warhol’s PORTRAIT OF TED O’NEIL (from ****).

THE BOYS OF NEW YORK (BONY) 1967. A film by Gregg Barrios.
BONY chronicles a day in the life of Warhol superstars and poets Gerard Malanga and Rene Ricard on a madcap trip from the Factory, the Chelsea Hotel, Horn & Hardarts to the silver painted Factory. Along the way these merry pranksters are joined Ruby Lynn Reynor, Tom Naef, Mario Anniballi, Ivy Nicholson and young Leonard Cohen. Filmed in B&W and Kodachrome with a 16mm Bolex camera Warhol provided. A portrait of a NYC long-vanished. Special Jury Finalist, 1968 Ann Arbor Film Festival.

FLOWER POWER THRILOGY (1966-1968). These short 8mm films were shot by Barrios for his film diary. They reflect the awe that the new generation was blooming…
1 Love & Fear
Innocence lost.
music: Youngbloods

2 Revolution
The worm turns.
music: Beatles

3 The Season of the Witch
The Coming of Nixon.
music: Donovan

THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER. (1967) A film by Jim Morrison and the Doors. My poet friend Gerard and I attended an after-hours at The Scene featuring Jimi Hendrix and the Doors. Afterwards, the two poets, Malanga and Jim spoke how new music and film were delivering the news to the youth. He studied filmmaking at UCLA and co-directed a film clip of their latest song. He later sent a copy to Cinema 40 to screen at the onset of our programming. The LA Weekly critic called it as powerful as Coppola’s Apocalyse Now. Peace out, Jimbo!

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